September Awareness Month

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  While September is Childhood Cancer Awareness month, childhood cancer is an everyday reality for thousands of families around the world. We’ve compiled 10 facts you need to know (and can share!) about childhood cancer:

1. Childhood cancer is not one disease, but several.

Childhood cancer is made up of over a dozen different types and countless subtypes. Cancer in children can begin virtually anywhere in the body. The causes of most types of childhood cancer are not known and are not strongly linked to lifestyle or environmental risk factors, unlike many adult cancers. Researchers are beginning to understand some of the genetic mutations that might cause certain types of childhood cancer and use that information to search for cures. You can learn more about the different types of childhood cancer, including brain tumors, leukemia and other solid tumors like neuroblastoma here. 
    
2.  Every day, there are almost 700 new cases of childhood cancer around the world.

This is equivalent to an entire elementary school of children. This adds up to over 250,000 new cases of cancer each year in children under the age of 20. 
 
3. Childhood cancer is the leading cause of death by disease in children in the United States.

 
 Chiari malformations are structural defects in the base of the skull and cerebellum, the part of the brain that controls balance.  Normally the cerebellum and parts of the brain stem sit above an opening in the skull that allows the spinal cord to pass through it (called the foramen magnum).  When part of the cerebellum extends below the foramen magnum and into the upper spinal canal, it is called a Chiari malformation (CM).   Chiari malformations may develop when part of the skull is smaller than normal or misshapen, which forces the cerebellum to be pushed down into the foramen magnum and spinal canal.  This causes pressure on the cerebellum and brain stem that may affect functions controlled by these areas and block the flow of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)—the clear liquid that surrounds and cushions the brain and spinal cord.  The CSF also circulates nutrients and chemicals filtered from the blood and removes waste products from the brain.

Chiari malformations are structural defects in the base of the skull and cerebellum, the part of the brain that controls balance.  Normally the cerebellum and parts of the brain stem sit above an opening in the skull that allows the spinal cord to pass through it (called the foramen magnum).  When part of the cerebellum extends below the foramen magnum and into the upper spinal canal, it is called a Chiari malformation (CM). 

Chiari malformations may develop when part of the skull is smaller than normal or misshapen, which forces the cerebellum to be pushed down into the foramen magnum and spinal canal.  This causes pressure on the cerebellum and brain stem that may affect functions controlled by these areas and block the flow of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)—the clear liquid that surrounds and cushions the brain and spinal cord.  The CSF also circulates nutrients and chemicals filtered from the blood and removes waste products from the brain.

Please Share For Awareness

John JenksComment